SEEN. 3 x Moves Towards Biophilia Design

Innis Free

In an increasingly urbanised and digital world, where 54.5% of the global population are living in cities, projected to rise to 60% by 2030, humanising the store experience with plant life is a practice that’s being used with progressively compelling effect. 


SEEN is compiled by LOVE’s Head of Culture Kat Towers. Want to say hello, ask questions or challenge her cultural knowledge then get in touch here. Access to nature has been shown to reduce stress and improve coping mechanisms, benefiting physical, mental and social health. Plants and natural design elements soften tech-filled – and often harshly lit – retail spaces, and can take many forms, from nature-inspired architecture and textiles, to water features and living walls.

Skincare brand Innisfree created a greenhouse-inspired environment for their Seoul store, rich in natural light. Their signature living walls create a softening influence, serving their blossoming consumer appetite for ‘slow’ – an antidote to city-induced stress. 


Pantone’s Outside In House  

It came as no surprise that Pantone’s Colour of the Year was ‘Greenery’. Pantone choses colours that reflect current values, and this year’s choice echoes the importance placed on nature and its connection to wellbeing. According to Pantone, the colour ‘signals consumers to take a deep breath, oxygenate and reinvigorate’. 

To celebrate ‘Greenery’, Pantone collaborated with Airbnb to create the ‘Outside In House’ in Clerkenwell, taking over a ground-level building filled with nature-tinged products, pale wood furniture and clusters of real plants. 


Apple

Apple used the launch of its San Francisco flagship to showcase their evolving store blueprint with a number of ‘organic’ revisions - stainless steel and glass with wood, trees and plenty of natural light. Echoed externally, the design’s key feature is ‘The Plaza’ - a 24/7 outdoor ‘backyard’ area, including a 50-ft living wall that serves as a backdrop for live weekly music performances and talks. 

Creating a sense of transition, from frenetic retail environments through biophilia design, can increase the feeling of being relaxed by 56%, which equates to more dwell time. And with a 1% increase in positive dwell time equating to a 1.3% increase in spend - it’s no wonder retailers are taking note.


SEEN is compiled by LOVE’s Head of Culture Kat Towers. Want to say hello, ask questions or challenge her cultural knowledge then get in touch kattowers@lovecreative.com.